3 min read

Achilles tendinitis (also spelled tendonitis) is an injury – often characterized by a mild to moderate ache, tenderness, swelling, or morning stiffness - that affects the area in the back of the lower leg at and above the heel bone, specifically the band of tissue that connects the heel and the calf muscles.

What Causes Achilles Tendinitis?

Achilles tendinitis is a type of injury that occurs from repetitive strain and overuse, commonly in runners, especially in cases where you have made a drastic change in the intensity or duration of your training -- this results in inflammation. Certain training conditions, medical conditions, and natural physical attributes may put you at a higher risk, but there are steps you can take to ensure you avoid this injury, such as wearing supportive plantar fasciitis socks.

Risk Factors for Achilles Tendinitis

Runners are not the only ones who suffer from Achilles Tendinitis – tennis players and basketball players are among several other groups who may have this condition, especially if you do not play on a regular basis or at least several times a week. Some other factors that increase the risk of developing Achilles Tendinitis are:

  • Males are more likely to experience than females
  • Obesity or being overweight puts extra strain on the ankle
  • High blood pressure puts one at more risk
  • Running in worn-out shoes
  • Running in cold weather or with cold muscles
  • Running on very steep or rough terrains
  • Having flat arches or high arches
  • Age brings a higher risk

Left untreated, Achilles Tendinitis can turn into a torn or ruptured tendon, which requires further treatment and longer recovery time – so it is important to support your ankle during recovery, or if you have known problems with this area, every time you train in order to prevent a recurrence.

How is Achilles Tendinitis Treated?

At the onset of pain, a regimen of rest, ice, elevation, and taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication can help with recovery from Achilles Tendinitis. It is recommended to completely avoid putting weight on the affected ankle if possible for the first two days. After that, doing gentle daily stretches - or even physical therapy for a time - are also useful in recovery.

You can reduce your risk of experiencing Achilles Tendinitis by choosing to only gradually and slowly step up your training intensity or duration, and warming up beforehand, as well as being careful about where you are training so that you are not excessively straining your calf muscles and ankles.

Especially when also worn with supportive shoes, plantar fasciitis socks can help tremendously. These socks provide arch support and overall ankle and foot support. They can also aid in keeping the area warm, preventing further injury.

As the area of the Achilles tendon does not naturally have the best blood supply, plantar fasciitis socks are also useful for providing better circulation through compression, which reduces swelling, and stops heel pain. Made from a lightweight, thin, and stretchy material, plantar fasciitis socks can be worn with any shoes or even under other socks, all day or all night.

Wear Plantar Fasciitis Socks - For The Prevention and Treatment of Achilles Tendinitis, Plantar Fasciitis, and Many Other Foot Problems

For the prevention of Achilles Tendinitis or recovery from this condition, you should consider having a few pairs of plantar fasciitis socks (click here to read our blog about plantar fasciitis socks and all of the foot problems they treat and prevent!), so you can change them out consistently and keep the area supported at all times. As a world leader in plantar fasciitis socks, Physix Gear Sport offers a 100% satisfaction guarantee.  That means there is no risk to you if you choose to order plantar fasciitis socks today and have them shipped to your home to try - if for some reason they don’t work for you, send them back for a full refund. Click here to browse plantar fasciitis socks now!


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